Zea Morvitz

Posted by on Sep 10, 2011 in Artists | 0 comments

ZeaMorvitz-Floater #3 thumbnail
Floater1 thumbnail
Zea Morvitz-Ballinglen Dwg 7 thumbnail
Zea Morvitz-Ballinglen-Dwg 6 thumbnail
Zea Morvitz BallinglenDwg 9 thumbnail
ZeaMorvitz-Natural-History2 thumbnail
Zea Morvitz HourGlassAndVessel-2010-v2 thumbnail
Untitled-2010 thumbnail
Zea Morvitz Hares Dream thumbnail
Zea Morvitz,  6 Books of Rules & Instructions, m/m on discarded books thumbnail
Zea Morvitz, 9 Cobalt Books, acrylic on discarded books thumbnail

ZeaMorvitz-Floater #3

Floater1

Zea Morvitz-Ballinglen Dwg 7

Zea Morvitz-Ballinglen-Dwg 6

Zea Morvitz BallinglenDwg 9

ZeaMorvitz-Natural-History2

Zea Morvitz HourGlassAndVessel-2010-v2

Untitled-2010

Zea Morvitz Hares Dream

Zea Morvitz, 6 Books of Rules & Instructions, m/m on discarded books

Zea Morvitz, 9 Cobalt Books, acrylic on discarded books

I am fascinated by ruins and abandoned objects; decayed, burned out structures sinking into the earth, rusted, busted artifacts, things once useful, that got rained on & thrown away. I especially love tattered old books and ancient stones.

My Books: I have my own mythology about books. More than once as a child I visited houses with neglected bookcases full of dusty old hardbacks, with old-fashioned illustrations, smelling of mold. To me they were mysterious, fascinating objects. Often in my work I reenact the experience of discovering something darkly mysterious within that familiar object – an old book. The books I use are discards, rescued on their way to landfill.

My Drawings: I have been working in graphite on paper for about 10 years and still feel deeply engaged with this medium. The Japanese Surface Gampi paper was a chance discovery that opened new graphic possibilities for me. I also make and bind artist books and some small edition multiples.

In 2010, during a residency on the West Coast of Ireland, I found myself in a long-cultivated landscape where many ancient stone monuments of extreme simplicity lay open to the sky. The drawings I made there reflect that simplicity and the basic materials of things made thousands of years ago.

Visit the artist’s visual blog